300hr YTT Detail

COURSE CONTENT:
Sample days:
Forward Bend Class: 90 minutes
Teaching: Sequencing for Forward Bends 90 minutes
Lunch
Yoga Anatomy of Stretching: 90 minutes
Strength and Conditioning Training: Inversion skill work. Arm and Shoulder strength work 120 minutes
Yoga Anatomy: Hamstrings in Forward Bends 90 minutes

Backbend Class: 90 minutes
Teaching: Sequencing for Back Bends 90 minutes
Lunch
Yoga Anatomy: Progressive loading for Backbends 90 minutes
Strength and Conditioning Training: Flexibility work. Inversion Skill work 120 minutes
Yoga Anatomy: The shoulders in Backbends 90 minutes

Yin Yoga Class: 90 minutes
Yin Methods: 90 minutes
Yin Poses for Teaching: 90 minutes
Lunch
Breath and the Nervous System in Yoga 90 minutes
Strength and Conditioning: Inversion skill work. 60 minutes
Mediation class: 90 minutes


Module 1: Grounded: from the feet up

SLIDE02.jpg

How do we balance on one leg? Through the correct grounding of our feet, the correct alignment of foot to knee to hip, and the withdrawal of our senses, pratyahara or single pointed concentration. How do we balance on our hands? Through the grounding of our hands, and the use of our legs and feet to flow up in the inversion. The grounding of our feet and legs is often neglected in yoga but is so important in allowing each asana to expand and flow, increasing ease and concentration in the posture. Without the work of the feet and legs, the chest cannot expand in the backbends, we cannot flow up in our inversions, or root down in splits or forward bends.

Themes in this module include:
– practice: how to use the feet and the legs in to help you practice and progress in backbends, twists, forward bends, inversions and arm balances,
– poses: the understanding of the anatomy of the foot, ankle and knee in yoga poses
– injury:  how to work safely with injuries and adjust the foot and knee
– teaching and adjusting: how to teach and adjust intermediate & advanced level balances such as natarajasana, viribhradasana III, ardha baddha padma padmottasana, sirsasana (headstand), sarvangasana (shoulderstand), nirlamba sarvangasana (unsupported shoulder stand), eka pada urdhva dhanurasana (one leg wheel), adho Mukha Vrksasana (handstand)
– intelligent sequencing: how to create flow sequences to facilitate the correct movement in your and your student’s bodies to achieve advanced poses
___________________________________________________________________________

private-yoga

Module 2: Freedom: the hip joint and its relationship to the legs and the core

Open the hips is a statement made by many yoga teachers but what does it really mean? If anything at all. We don’t just want to work on lengthening the hip socket muscles but to cater to the individual’s body and to maintain strength whilst lengthening.The hip joint & muscles give us the freedom to run and play, and walk into the yoga studio to practice asana but without strength in the hip muscles this is not possible. The same sense of freedom and ease that we have when we walk should be felt in our asana practice. This is the openness and strength, the balance of the two, that we require in practice.
The hips, like the complex shoulder joint, have a huge range of movement, which differs from person to person. Yoga gives us options to offer different hip related asana to move the hips in all ways, catering to the individual in a safe, strengthening but opening way.

Themes in this module include:
– practice: how to know how to place your hip to help you achieve freer, steadier and safer forward bends, standing poses, arm balances, extreme forward bends, lotus, twists, inversions variations
– poses: the understanding of the anatomy of hip movement in yoga poses
– injury: how to read restriction in hip movement in your students, how to know when it is just shape of their bones restricting movement
– teaching: how to teach and adjust intermdediate & advanced level postures such as parivritta janu sirsansa, pigeon prep, eka pada rajakapotasana (king pigeon), hanamanasana (spilts), visvamistrasana, eka pada bakansa A& B (arm balances)focusing on hip movement
– intelligent sequencing: how to create flow sequences to facilitate the correct movement in yours and your students bodies to achieve advanced poses
___________________________________________________________________________
Module 3: Stability and ease: from the feet to the pelvis

The pelvis is our fulcrum. From the pelvis the spine flows up, and the legs flow down. It is our stabilising area, the correct position of the pelvis allows us to “sit with ease” (asana) Without alignment from the pelvis in daily life, we cannot stand in our functional curves, in Yoga we cannot balance in inversions, we fall over in arm balances, we compress our lower backs or our necks in all backbends and forward bends, we hurt our sacral joint in twists. The positioning of the pelvis in asana determines whether our legs AND our spine can function safely and optimally.

Different approaches to handstand poses relating to pelvis position and scapula pressing – appropriate to various levels of practitioners

Themes in this module include:
– practice: how to position the pelvis in backbends, forward bends, twists, inversions
– poses: the understanding of the anatomy of the pelvis  -how to work safely with injuries and adjust the pelvis in all asana

– teaching: how to teach and adjust for intermediate & advanced level postures such as uppavishta konasana, ardha matsyendrasana I and II (twists) eka pada rajakapotasana (king pigeon), hanamanasana (splits), pincha mayurasana and variations (scorpion) focusing on pelvic positioning

– how to create flow sequences to facilitate the correct movement to achieve advanced & intermediate poses for you and your students

___________________________________________________________________________________

oksana01

Module 4: What is Core: the abdominal muscles and diaphragmWhat is core? The word has become a huge part of yoga and the fitness world in general. But what is it?  Core means centre but what is that in our bodies? Do we have a ‘core’ that protects the spine? Our core (abdominal muscles) and diaphragmatic muscles have to be balanced, front and back, side to side, deep and superficial, all working to give us strength to hold, flexibility to move, and breath to live.

Themes include:
– practice: how recruit abdominal muscles within intermediate and advanced yoga poses
– poses: how to teach breath work within yoga poses
– teaching: how to teach & adjust intermediate & advanced level postures such as parivritta janu sirsansa, advanced arm balances such as visvamistrasasana, eka pada koudinyasana 1 & 2, advanced twists, urdhava dhanurasana and variations (upward bow) and inversions focusing on abdominal muscles and breath
– intelligent sequencing: how to create flow sequences to facilitate the correct functional movement to achieve intermediate & advanced postures using the core muscles
– how to help your students use breath in flow
______________________________________________________________________________

Module 5: Integrity: The Spine, Neck, Eyes and Brain.
Neuroscience behind focus and mindfulness. 

Yoga is a Nervous System practice from the cells of our muscles in a stretch to the focus of balance in a handstand. 

In life we seek a balance of reaction in difficult situations, a focused calm and a clear mind. We begin to learn this behaviour in yoga. 

In this module we explore the nervous system (the spine and the brain) in regular yoga, advanced pose yoga, restorative yoga, yin yoga, and yoga for trauma. 

Even simple balances are made difficult when we lose concentration, and as the asana becomes more difficult, more frightening, and of course the more difficult the concentration. This is a fascinating module that will address the problems around spinal movement in yoga as well as a look into how our nervous system can be used to help us with focus and control. 

Advanced asana, especially inversions such as handstand and forearm balance can bring up fear and anxiety. As practitioners and teachers we need to be able draw our attention away from the fear to a point of focused calm, by using concentration and mindfulness.

Themes in this module include:
– poses: the anatomy of the spinal and muscles that support the neck
– injury: how to work safely with and adjust the spine in asana
– teaching: how to teach and adjust intermediate & advanced level postures in backbending and inversions including urdhva dhanurasana (wheel), chakrasana,  kapotasana, pincha mayurasana, and other big backbends.
– practice: we learn how to play with arm balances and inversions focusing on spinal curves and protection.
– intelligent sequencing: how to create flow sequences to facilitate the correct movement of the spine to achieve advanced poses for you and your student
– how to work with pratyahara – focus and control in all poses, in a way that will help us move to being comfortable in advanced asana.
___________________________________________________________________________________

COLLAGE.jpg

Module 6: Seeing clearly upside down: Shoulders, arms, wrists, hands

In yoga, we spend a lot of time on our hands, on the floor and upside down. In fact we are upside down more than probably any other movement type other than gymnastics.

Shoulder injuries are the most common form of injury in yoga along with lower back injuries. Most of us have had some kind of shoulder problem, certainly in fast vinyasa.

We need, as advanced teachers, to be able to understand the high risk of injury in our students and be able to modify shoulder and wrist positions when needed. At the same time, we also need to be able to develop the strength and flexibility, as well as the positioning of the hands and wrists needed in our students shoulders and wrists so that we can progress ourselves and our students to stronger poses.

COURSE CONTENT:

Module 1: Grounded: from the feet up

SLIDE02.jpg

How do we balance on one leg? Through the correct grounding of our feet, the correct alignment of foot to knee to hip, and the withdrawal of our senses, pratyahara or single pointed concentration. How do we balance on our hands? Through the grounding of our hands, and the use of our legs and feet to flow up in the inversion. The grounding of our feet and legs is often neglected in yoga but is so important in allowing each asana to expand and flow, increasing ease and concentration in the posture. Without the work of the feet and legs, the chest cannot expand in the backbends, we cannot flow up in our inversions, or root down in splits or forward bends.

Themes in this module include:
– practice: how to use the feet and the legs in to help you practice and progress in backbends, twists, forward bends, inversions and arm balances,
– poses: the understanding of the anatomy of the foot, ankle and knee in yoga poses
– injury:  how to work safely with injuries and adjust the foot and knee
– teaching and adjusting: how to teach and adjust intermediate & advanced level balances such as natarajasana, viribhradasana III, ardha baddha padma padmottasana, sirsasana (headstand), sarvangasana (shoulderstand), nirlamba sarvangasana (unsupported shoulder stand), eka pada urdhva dhanurasana (one leg wheel), adho Mukha Vrksasana (handstand)
– intelligent sequencing: how to create flow sequences to facilitate the correct movement in your and your student’s bodies to achieve advanced poses
___________________________________________________________________________

private-yoga

Module 2: Freedom: the hip joint and its relationship to the legs and the core

Open the hips is a statement made by many yoga teachers but what does it really mean? If anything at all. We don’t just want to work on lengthening the hip socket muscles but to cater to the individual’s body and to maintain strength whilst lengthening.The hip joint & muscles give us the freedom to run and play, and walk into the yoga studio to practice asana but without strength in the hip muscles this is not possible. The same sense of freedom and ease that we have when we walk should be felt in our asana practice. This is the openness and strength, the balance of the two, that we require in practice.
The hips, like the complex shoulder joint, have a huge range of movement, which differs from person to person. Yoga gives us options to offer different hip related asana to move the hips in all ways, catering to the individual in a safe, strengthening but opening way.

Themes in this module include:
– practice: how to know how to place your hip to help you achieve freer, steadier and safer forward bends, standing poses, arm balances, extreme forward bends, lotus, twists, inversions variations
– poses: the understanding of the anatomy of hip movement in yoga poses
– injury: how to read restriction in hip movement in your students, how to know when it is just shape of their bones restricting movement
– teaching: how to teach and adjust intermdediate & advanced level postures such as parivritta janu sirsansa, pigeon prep, eka pada rajakapotasana (king pigeon), hanamanasana (spilts), visvamistrasana, eka pada bakansa A& B (arm balances)focusing on hip movement
– intelligent sequencing: how to create flow sequences to facilitate the correct movement in yours and your students bodies to achieve advanced poses
___________________________________________________________________________
Module 3: Stability and ease: from the feet to the pelvis

The pelvis is our fulcrum. From the pelvis the spine flows up, and the legs flow down. It is our stabilising area, the correct position of the pelvis allows us to “sit with ease” (asana) Without alignment from the pelvis in daily life, we cannot stand in our functional curves, in Yoga we cannot balance in inversions, we fall over in arm balances, we compress our lower backs or our necks in all backbends and forward bends, we hurt our sacral joint in twists. The positioning of the pelvis in asana determines whether our legs AND our spine can function safely and optimally.

Different approaches to handstand poses relating to pelvis position and scapula pressing – appropriate to various levels of practitioners

Themes in this module include:
– practice: how to position the pelvis in backbends, forward bends, twists, inversions
– poses: the understanding of the anatomy of the pelvis  -how to work safely with injuries and adjust the pelvis in all asana

– teaching: how to teach and adjust for intermediate & advanced level postures such as uppavishta konasana, ardha matsyendrasana I and II (twists) eka pada rajakapotasana (king pigeon), hanamanasana (splits), pincha mayurasana and variations (scorpion) focusing on pelvic positioning

– how to create flow sequences to facilitate the correct movement to achieve advanced & intermediate poses for you and your students

___________________________________________________________________________________

oksana01

Module 4: What is Core: the abdominal muscles and diaphragmWhat is core? The word has become a huge part of yoga and the fitness world in general. But what is it?  Core means centre but what is that in our bodies? Do we have a ‘core’ that protects the spine? Our core (abdominal muscles) and diaphragmatic muscles have to be balanced, front and back, side to side, deep and superficial, all working to give us strength to hold, flexibility to move, and breath to live.

Themes include:
– practice: how recruit abdominal muscles within intermediate and advanced yoga poses
– poses: how to teach breath work within yoga poses
– teaching: how to teach & adjust intermediate & advanced level postures such as parivritta janu sirsansa, advanced arm balances such as visvamistrasasana, eka pada koudinyasana 1 & 2, advanced twists, urdhava dhanurasana and variations (upward bow) and inversions focusing on abdominal muscles and breath
– intelligent sequencing: how to create flow sequences to facilitate the correct functional movement to achieve intermediate & advanced postures using the core muscles
– how to help your students use breath in flow
______________________________________________________________________________

Module 5: Integrity: The Spine, Neck, Eyes and Brain.
Neuroscience behind focus and mindfulness. 

Yoga is a Nervous System practice from the cells of our muscles in a stretch to the focus of balance in a handstand. 

In life we seek a balance of reaction in difficult situations, a focused calm and a clear mind. We begin to learn this behaviour in yoga. 

In this module we explore the nervous system (the spine and the brain) in regular yoga, advanced pose yoga, restorative yoga, yin yoga, and yoga for trauma. 

Even simple balances are made difficult when we lose concentration, and as the asana becomes more difficult, more frightening, and of course the more difficult the concentration. This is a fascinating module that will address the problems around spinal movement in yoga as well as a look into how our nervous system can be used to help us with focus and control. 

Advanced asana, especially inversions such as handstand and forearm balance can bring up fear and anxiety. As practitioners and teachers we need to be able draw our attention away from the fear to a point of focused calm, by using concentration and mindfulness.

Themes in this module include:
– poses: the anatomy of the spinal and muscles that support the neck
– injury: how to work safely with and adjust the spine in asana
– teaching: how to teach and adjust intermediate & advanced level postures in backbending and inversions including urdhva dhanurasana (wheel), chakrasana,  kapotasana, pincha mayurasana, and other big backbends.
– practice: we learn how to play with arm balances and inversions focusing on spinal curves and protection.
– intelligent sequencing: how to create flow sequences to facilitate the correct movement of the spine to achieve advanced poses for you and your student
– how to work with pratyahara – focus and control in all poses, in a way that will help us move to being comfortable in advanced asana.
___________________________________________________________________________________

COLLAGE.jpg

Module 6: Seeing clearly upside down: Shoulders, arms, wrists, hands

In yoga, we spend a lot of time on our hands, on the floor and upside down. In fact we are upside down more than probably any other movement type other than gymnastics.

Shoulder injuries are the most common form of injury in yoga along with lower back injuries. Most of us have had some kind of shoulder problem, certainly in fast vinyasa.

We need, as advanced teachers, to be able to understand the high risk of injury in our students and be able to modify shoulder and wrist positions when needed. At the same time, we also need to be able to develop the strength and flexibility, as well as the positioning of the hands and wrists needed in our students shoulders and wrists so that we can progress ourselves and our students to stronger poses.

Themes in this module include:
– poses: the anatomy of the shoulder and the muscles in yoga poses
– practice: the balance of strength and flexibility of the wrist & shoulder muscles needed in yoga
– injury: how to read restriction and weakness of the shoulder & wrist joint in your students
– teaching: how to teach upside down poses – intermediate & advanced level postures such as adho mukha svasana (downward dog), vasisthasana (side arm balance), urdhva dhanurasana (wheel), inversions, arm balances and pretty much the rest of yoga asana.
– intelligent sequencing: how to create flow sequences to facilitate the correct movement of the shoulders to achieve intermediate & advanced postures500hr Wellness Connection qualified teachers 
Kaya Bryce  MyUtopia, Yogazone
Bev Slauck Yogazone, YogaSpirit, B Yoga
Celeste de Bryun. Studio owner Move Me Mind Body Joburg. www.movememindbody.co.za
Celeste Cohen. Studio owner. Sky above Studio https://skyaboveyogastudio.com
Laura Norton. 200hr and 500hr Teacher Trainer. Studio owner. The Yoga Mala www.facebook.com/theyogamala/
Rolaine Paterson. Studio Owner. Yama Yoga www.yamayoga.co.za
Bianca McHarg. Studio Owner. B Yoga. Byoga.co.za
Sandy Cornish: Teacher. City Rock. MyUtopia
Claire Weight. Teacher Trainer. Wellness Connection 200hr, Kids Yoga Teacher Training, Back Care Teacher Training
Kristina Holland: Pregnancy Teacher Trainer 
Mandy Hewlett: Advanced workshop teacher, Sports Yoga teacher, Velocity Sports Lab, B Yoga
Carla Collins: Wellness Connection 200hr Teacher Trainer, Yin Teacher Trainer. 
Kaya Bryce: Yoga Zone, My UtopiaTeacher
Bev Slauck: Teacher:Yoga Spirit, Yogazone, Yoyoga, B Yoga Teacher. Synapticyoga.co.za
Sian Williams: Studio owner. Glow Prenatal Yoga. Pregancy Yoga Teacher Trainer
Lauren Burger: Teacher: Sangha Spot
Nicole Mackintosh: Teacher: YogaBodySpace
Penny Cooper: Teacher: Yoga Body Space & My Utopia
Romy Paul: Teacher: The Yoga Mala
Wendy Paarman: Teacher. Wendy Yoga
Delayne Badenhorst: Teacher: Delayne Yoga
Kim Cornell: Yoga Heart Hermanus
Violeta Velakova
Chantel Do Cabeco
Sara James
Christi Wasserman. Owner www.hellohappiest.com
Jason Basset
Bianca Visser
Amber Watson
Lucia Newnham
Francoise SchallWakai. Yoga Luanda Angola
Maria Paymans
Rae-Sean
Leonie Glaser
Carishma Basday
Ceri Berry
Veronique de Vries
Kelly Shreuder
Julia Thomashoff